POTW: Ke$ha, Jay-Z, Adam Lambert, Beyonce
LOS ANGELES, CA - MAY 15: Singer Ke$ha attends KIIS FM's 2010 Wango Tango Concert at Nokia Theatre L.A. Live on May 15, 2010 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Mark Sullivan/WireImage) Mark Sullivan/WireImage

ADDICTED TO 'LOVE': Ke$ha becomes the fifth female artist since the beginning of 2000, and the third in the last two years, to earn at least two No. 1s from a debut album on Billboard's Pop Songs radio airplay chart, as "Your Love Is My Drug," the third single from "Animal," lifts 2-1.

All charts on billboard.com will be refreshed Thursday.

Ke$ha spent seven weeks atop Pop Songs beginning in February with her introductory single, "TiK ToK." Follow-up "Blah Blah Blah," featuring 3OH!3, peaked at No. 11 in March. (Ke$ha returns the favor, guesting on 3OH!3's "My First Kiss," which rises 29-26 this week).

Here is a look at the five female artists since 2000 to notch multiple Pop Songs toppers from their debut sets:

Christina Aguilera, debut album: "Christina Aguilera"
"Genie in a Bottle" (four weeks at No. 1, 1999)
"What a Girl Wants" (two weeks at No. 1, 2000)

Avril Lavigne, debut album: "Let Go"
"Complicated" (eight weeks at No. 1, 2002)
"Sk8er Boi" (one week at No. 1, 2002)
"I'm With You" (four weeks at No. 1, 2003)

Lady Gaga, debut album: "The Fame"
"Just Dance" (two weeks at No. 1, 2009)
"Poker Face" (five weeks at No. 1, 2009)
"LoveGame" (two weeks at No. 1, 2009)
"Paparazzi" (two weeks at No. 1, 2009)

Katy Perry, debut album: "One of the Boys"
"Hot N Cold" (three weeks at No. 1, 2008)
"Waking Up in Vegas" (two weeks at No. 1, 2009)

Ke$ha, debut album: "Animal"
"TiK ToK" (seven weeks at No. 1, 2010)
"Your Love Is My Drug" (one week at No. 1 to date, 2010)

"Animal" roared onto the Billboard 200 at No. 1 on the chart dated Jan. 23. The album has remained in the survey's top 25 since, with sales of 750,000 copies totaled since its release, according to Nielsen SoundScan.

COME-'BACK' HIT: Phil Collins ends his longest absence from the Adult Contemporary chart, as "Going Back" bows at No. 26. The title cut lead single from Collins' forthcoming eighth studio album, featuring covers of soul/pop classics, marks his 32nd entry on the survey dating to his first. He initially reached the chart with the No. 9-peaking "You Can't Hurry Love" in 1982.

Collins' Adult Contemporary discography is now bookended by '60s remakes. The Supremes' original version of "You Can't Hurry Love" topped the Billboard Hot 100 and R&B/Hip-Hop Songs in 1966. "Goin' Back" reached No. 89 on the Hot 100 by the Byrds in 1967; the Gerry Goffin/Carole King-written song has been recorded by numerous acts, including Freddie Mercury, the Pretenders and Diana Ross.

Until this week, Collins had last appeared on Adult Contemporary on Aug. 27, 2005, when "You Touch My Heart" wrapped a 10-week run after peaking at No. 25.

Collins has collected 23 Adult Contemporary top 10s, including nine No. 1s.

'1901,'-TWO PUNCH: Glassnote Records band Phoenix becomes the first act signed to an independent label to log two Alternative Songs top 10s simultaneously. The French quartet earns the honor with an 11-9 jump for "Lisztomania." The group's former No. 1 "1901" remains in the top 10 at No. 7.

This week also marks the first time that an act's first two Alternative Songs singles have shared space in the top 10 concurrently since Puddle of Mudd managed the achievement with "Control" and "Blurry" in December 2001.

Phoenix is the fourth act to double up in the Alternative Songs chart's top 10 with its first two entries. Papa Roach and 3 Doors Down each earned the honor a year before Puddle of Mudd's feat.

COMPLETE BEAT: With "Tried & True" debuting at No. 9 on the Billboard 200, Clay Aiken scores his fifth top 10 on the chart. Where does that sum rank the 2003 "American Idol" runner-up among the series' former finalists for most top 10 titles? For the answer, and exclusive analysis of all of Billboard's sales and airplay surveys, check tomorrow's posting of Chart Beat.

Questions? Comments? Let us know: @billboard

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