Women in Music 2016

Philip Glass-Scored 'Fantastic Four' Trailer Reveals Darker Direction for Reboot

Twentieth Century Fox/Marvel
A still from the 2015 film The Fantastic Four.

One of the longest-running (but arguably least respected) franchises in Marvel Comics is finally getting The Dark Knight treatment.

Not that Marvel would admit that, of course, since Batman is a DC Comics franchise, but the just-released trailer for the Fantastic Four reboot reveals that the kitschy quartet are starring in a film that takes their story very seriously.

The first clue? The aching, meditative soundtrack, which comes courtesy of contemporary classical legend Philip Glass.

And this trailer isn't simply reusing some of his old music. 20th Century Fox scored Glass -- who created celebrated scores for The Thin Blue Line, The Hours, the Qatsi Trilogy and many more films -- to create new music for the blockbuster.

Josh Trank, the director of the third Fantastic Four film in 21 years (although only two were released, more on that later*), cites David Cronenberg's cinematic vision as key to his reimagining of the franchise. [Given that Cronenberg never helmed a blockbuster, this trailer seems more visually indebted to Christopher Nolan, but again, Marvel can't really name-check the Batman director].

In an interview with Collider, Trank revealed he managed to convince the Oscar-nominated Glass this superhero movie was worth his time due to the "philosophical" nature of his last film, Chronicle.

"I got his manager's number and gave them a call," Trank said. "Philip Glass is one of my heroes. Whenever I'm writing or drawing I always put on Philip Glass. This is my first time making a movie with a score and I thought, 'why not give it a shot?'

"The first words out of his mouth were, 'I just saw your movie [2012's Chronicle] and it's very philosophical.' We were talking about the philosophy of Chronicle and it gave me goosebumps. We invited him out to set [of Fantastic Four] and he came to set for like three days and had a great time. He was blown away by the scale of the film. I've been working with him for almost a year now and he's so inspiring. He's such a humble, amazing guy."

With Glass scoring the project and Cronenberg influencing it, it's a safe bet this will be the most somber movie starring a man who can stretch like rubber to ever come out of Hollywood.

*A low-budget version of The Fantastic Four was finished but left unreleased in 1994 in order that Marvel could keep the rights. The actors had no idea they were in a film that was never intended for release.